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Courses

TABLE 1: 100 LEVEL COURSES

Course Code

Course Title

Units

Status

GES 101

The Use of English

2

Compulsory

GES 103

 Government, Society & Economy) 

 

3

Compulsory

GES 107

Reproductive Health, Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) and Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)

2

Compulsory

GES 108

Introduction to French

2

Required

MAT 111

Algebra

4

Required

MAT 121

Calculus & Trigonometry

4

Required

MAT 141

Analytical Geometry & Mechanics

4

Required

CHE 126

Inorganic Chemistry

3

Required

CHE 156

Physical Chemistry

3

Required

CHE 176

Organic Chemistry

3

Required

CHE 191

Practical Chemistry for 100 Level

2

Required

PHY 102

Introductory Mechanics & Properties of Matter

3

Required

PHY 103

Introductory Heat & Thermodynamics

3

Required

 PHY 104

Introductory Electricity & Magnetism

3

Required

PHY 105

Introductory Wave, Optics & Modern Physics

3

Required

STA 114

General Statistics

3

Required

TME 111

Basic Engineering Drawing

2

Required

TME 121

Basic Workshop Practice

1

Required

PHY 118 

Experimental Physics

3

Elective

Total Units: Compulsory = 7 Units; Required = 43 Units; Electives = 3Units

TABLE 2: 200 LEVEL COURSES

Course Code

Course Title

Units

Status

GES 201

Use of English II

2

Required

GES 102

GES 102 African Cultures & Civilization

2

Required

GES 106

Philosophy, Logic & Critical Thinking

2

Required

TWE 211

Introduction to Wood & Biomaterials Engineering

2

Compulsory

TWE 212 OR 

TME 214

Introduction to Computing & ICT Applications in Biomaterials Engineering

 

Elementary Computer Programming 

3

Required

TWE 221

Field & Case Studies in Wood & Biomaterials Engineering

2

Compulsory

TCE 222

Theory of Structures

3

Required

TME 211

Engineering Drawing I

1

Compulsory

TME 212

Engineering Mechanics

2

Compulsory

TME 213

Thermodynamics

4

Required

TME 221

Workshop Practice I

2

Required

TME 224

Fluid Mechanics I

3

Required

TME 225

Strength of Materials I

4

Required

TIT 299

Students’ Work Experience Programme (SWEP)

2

Required

MAT 213

Algebra I

4

Required

MAT 242

Vectorial Mechanics

4

Required

MAT 223

Analysis (for Non-Majors)

4

Elective

STA 204

General Statistics II

3

Elective

TEL 231

Applied Electricity

4

Required

TEL 242

Basic Electrical & Electronic Measurements

2

Elective

TME 222

Engineering Drawing II

2

Elective

TME 223

Introduction to Engineering Practice

1

Elective

TIE 212

Principles of Economics for Engineers

2

Elective

SEF 220

Introduction to Climate Change & Renewable Natural Resources

2

Elective

Total Units: Compulsory = 7 Units; Required = 41 Units; Electives = 9 Units

 

TABLE 3: 300 LEVEL COURSES

Course Code

Course Title

Units

Status

GES 301

Introduction to Entrepreneurship Skills

2

Required

TWE 311

BasicProperties of Wood & Allied Biomaterials         

3

Compulsory

TWE 312

Harvesting of Timber and Non-Timber Forest Products         

2

Required

TWE 313

Wood & Biomaterials Identification 

2

Compulsory

TWE  321

Mechanical Properties of Wood & Biomaterials

3

Compulsory

TWE 322

Conversion Equipment for Wood & Biomaterials

3

Compulsory

TWE 323

Chemistry of Wood and Biomaterials

3

Required

TME 312

Workshop Practice II

1

Required

TME 313

Material Science

4

Required

TCE 313 OR TME 315

Structural Analysis I OR Strength of Materials II

3

Required

TME 321

Applied Thermodynamics

4

Required

TME 324

Design of Machine Elements

 3

Required

MAT 241

Ordinary Differential Equations

4

Required

MAT 351

Numerical Analysis

4

Required

TPE 316

Technical Writing & Presentation

2

Required

FPP 314

Principle of Silviculture

3

Required

TIT 399

Student Industrial Work Experience Scheme (SIWES I)

3

Required

TAE 310

Introduction to Farm Buildings & Structures

3

Elective

TCE 314

Structural Design I

3

Elective

TCE 325

Elements of Architecture

4

Elective

TCE 332

Materials for Construction

3

Elective

TCE 321

Civil Engineering Drawing

2

Elective

TIE 313

Engineering Economics

3

Elective

TIE 314

Work Study

3

Elective

TIE 321

Project Planning & Control I

3

Elective

TME 311

Engineering Drawing III

3

Elective

TME 314

Fluid Mechanics II

3

Elective

TME 316

Manufacturing Science I

4

Elective

TME 322 

Mechanics of Machines

4

Elective

Total Units: Compulsory =  9 Units; Required =  38 Units; Electives = 30 Units

 

 

TABLE 4: 400 LEVEL COURSES

Course Code

Course Title

Units

Status

TWE 411

Biodeterioration & Preservation of Wood & Bioproducts

3

Compulsory

TWE 412

Wood-Based Panels & Natural Fibre-Reinforced Composites

3

Compulsory

TWE 413

Environment, Society & the Use of Biomaterials

2

Compulsory

TIT 499

Student Industrial Work Experience Scheme (SIWES II)

6

Compulsory

TWE 414

Bioenergy Production Technologies

2

Required

TWE 415

Introduction to Furniture Analysis & Design 

3

Required

TWE 416

Polymer and Fibre Chemistry

2

Elective

TWE 417

Interior Design Materials & Innovation

2

Elective

TAE 414 

Design of Agricultural Structures

3

Elective

TIE 312

Operations Research

3

Elective

TIE 323

Accounting & Finance for Engineers

3

Elective

TIE 415

Industrial & Product Safety

2

Elective

TME 414

Applied Thermodynamics & Heat Transfer

4

Elective

SEF 421

Entrepreneurial Skills in Renewable Natural Resources

3

Elective

Total Units: Compulsory = 14 Units; Required = 5 Units; Electives = 22 Units

TABLE 5: 500 LEVEL COURSES

  1. Pulp & Paper Engineering Option

Course Code

Course Title

Units

Status

TWE 511

Structural Design with Sustainable Bioproducts I

3

Required

TWE 512

Quality Control & Marketing of Sustainable Bioproducts

3

Compulsory

TWE 513

Drying of Wood & Allied Biomaterials

3

Compulsory

TWE 514

Pulp Manufacturing &Its Derivatives

3

Compulsory

TWE 515

Sawmilling Systems

3

Required

TWE 516

Adhesives & Finishes for Sustainable Bioproducts Manufacturing

3

Compulsory

TWE 521

Paper Manufacturing Technology

3

Compulsory

TWE 522

Introduction to Sustainable Building Materials

3

Elective

TWE 523

Interior Design Materials & Processes 

2

Elective

TWE 524

Structural Design with Sustainable Bioproducts II

3

Required

TWE 525

Computer Modelling of Production Processes for Sustainable Bioproducts 

3

Required

TWE 526

Furniture Manufacturing with Sustainable Bioproducts 

3

Elective

TWE 529

Introduction to Polymer Engineering

3

Required

TWE 530

Pollution Sources, Effects & Control Measures

2

Elective

TWE 532

Biomaterial Waste Management 

2

Required

TWE 533

Rheology of Biomaterials

2

Elective

TWE 534

Non-Destructive Testing of Biomaterials

2

Elective

TWE 599

Final Year Project

6

Compulsory

TME 521

Engineering Law

2

Required

TAE 531

Environmental Engineering

3

Elective

TIE 511

Engineering Management

3

Elective

SEF 531

Forest Governance & Institutions

2

Elective

 

 

 

 

Total Units: Compulsory = 21Units; Required = 19 Units; Electives = 15 Units

 

  1. Biomaterial Processing & Utilisation Option

Course Code

Course Title

Units

Status

TWE 511

Structural Design with Sustainable Bioproducts I

3

Compulsory

TWE 512

Quality Control & Marketing of Sustainable Bioproducts

3

Compulsory

TWE 513

Drying of Wood & Allied Biomaterials

3

Compulsory

TWE 514

Pulp Manufacturing &Its Derivatives

2

Required

TWE 515

Sawmilling Systems

3

Compulsory

TWE 516

Adhesives & Finishes for Sustainable Bioproducts Manufacturing

3

Compulsory

TWE 521

Paper Manufacturing Technology

3

Required

TWE 522

Introduction to Sustainable Building Materials

3

Required

TWE 523

Interior Design Materials & Processes

2

Elective

TWE 524

Structural Design with Sustainable Bioproducts II

3

Required

TWE 525

Computer Modelling of Production Processes for Sustainable Bioproducts

3

Required

TWE 526

Furniture Manufacturing with Sustainable Bioproducts

3

Required

TWE 529

Introduction to Polymer Engineering

3

Elective

TWE 530

Pollution Sources, Effects & Control Measures

2

Elective

TWE 532

Biomaterial Waste Management 

2

Required

TWE 533

Rheology of Biomaterials

2

Elective

TWE 534

Non-Destructive Testing of Biomaterials

2

Elective

TWE 599

Final Year Project

6

Compulsory

TME 521

Engineering Law

2

Required

TIE 511

Engineering Management

3

Elective

TCE 515

Building Services Engineering

3

Elective

SEF 531

Forest Governance & Institutions

2

Elective

Total Units: Compulsory = 21 Units; Required = 21 Units; Electives = 14 Units

 

  1. Bioenergy Engineering Option

Course Code

Course Title

Units

Status

TWE 511

Structural Design with Sustainable Bioproducts I

3

Required

TWE 512

Quality Control & Marketing of Sustainable Bioproducts

3

Compulsory

TWE 513

Drying of Wood & Allied Biomaterials

3

Compulsory

TWE 514

Pulp Manufacturing &Its Derivatives

3

Required

TWE 515

Sawmilling Systems

3

Required

TWE 516

Adhesives & Finishes for Sustainable Bioproducts Manufacturing

3

Required

TWE 517 

Bioenergy Engineering 1

3

Compulsory

TWE 521

Paper Manufacturing Technology

3

Required

TWE 524

Structural Design with Sustainable Bioproducts II

3

Required

TWE 525

Computer Modelling of Production Processes for Sustainable Bioproducts

3

Required

TWE 526

Furniture Manufacturing with Sustainable Bioproducts

3

Elective

TWE 527

Energy, Environment & Climate Change

2

Compulsory

TWE 528

Carbon Stocks Management

2

Compulsory

TWE 530

Pollution Sources, Effects& Control Measures

2

Elective

TWE 531

Bioenergy Engineering II

2

Compulsory

TWE 532

Wood & Biomaterial Waste Management 

2

Elective

TWE 599

Final Year Project

6

Compulsory

TME 521

Engineering Law

2

Required

TAE 510

Introduction to Agricultural Waste Management

2

Elective

TAE 531

Environmental Engineering

3

Elective

TIE 511

Engineering Management

3

Elective

SEF 531

Forest Governance & Institutions

2

Elective

Total Units: Compulsory = 21 Units; Required =  23Units; Electives = 17 Units

 


 

Furniture Design & Manufacturing Option

Course Code

Course Title

Units

Status

TWE 511

Structural Design with Sustainable Bioproducts I

3

Compulsory

TWE 512

Quality Control & Marketing of Sustainable Bioproducts

3

Required

TWE 513

Drying of Wood & Allied Biomaterials

3

Compulsory

TWE 514

Pulp Manufacturing &Its Derivatives

2

Required

TWE 515

Sawmilling Systems

3

Required

TWE 516

Adhesives & Finishes for Sustainable Bioproducts Manufacturing

3

Compulsory

TWE 521

Paper Manufacturing Technology

3

Required

TWE 522

Introduction to Sustainable Building Materials

3

Required

TWE 523

 Interior Design Materials& Processes

2

Required

TWE 524

Structural Design with Sustainable Bioproducts II

3

Compulsory

TWE 525

Computer Modelling of Production Processes for Sustainable Bioproducts

3

Required

TWE 526

Furniture Manufacturing with Sustainable Bioproducts

3

Compulsory

TWE 533

Rheology of Biomaterials

2

Elective

TWE 534

Non-Destructive Testing of Biomaterials

2

Elective

TWE 599

Final Year Project

6

Compulsory

TME 521

Engineering Law

2

Required

TIE 511

Engineering Management

3

Elective

TCE 515

Building Services Engineering

3

Elective

TIE 411

Engineering Reliability

2

Elective

TIE 515

Facilities & Industrial Systems Design

4

Elective

TIE 524

Manufacturing Information Systems

3

Elective

SEF 531

Forest Governance & Institutions

2

Elective

Total Units: Compulsory = 21 Units; Required = 21 Units; Electives = 21 Units

 

  1. Structural Design Option

Course Code

Course Title

Units

Status

TWE 511

Structural Design with Sustainable Bioproducts I

3

Compulsory

TWE 512

Quality Control & Marketing of Sustainable Bioproducts

3

Compulsory

TWE 513

Drying of Wood & Allied Biomaterials

3

Compulsory

TWE 514

Pulp Manufacturing &Its Derivatives

2

Required

TWE 515

Sawmilling Systems

3

Required

TWE 516

Adhesives & Finishes for Sustainable Bioproducts Manufacturing

3

Required

TWE 521

Paper Manufacturing Technology

3

Required

TWE 522

Introduction to Sustainable Building Materials

3

Compulsory

TWE 523

Interior Decoration Materials & Processes 

2

Elective

TWE 524

Structural Design with Sustainable Bioproducts II

3

Compulsory

TWE 525

Computer Modelling of Production Processes for Sustainable Bioproducts

3

Required

TWE 526

Furniture Manufacturing with Sustainable Bioproducts

3

Required

TWE 533

Rheology of Biomaterials

2

Required

TWE 534

Non-Destructive Testing of Biomaterials

2

Required

TWE 599

Final Year Project

6

Compulsory

TME 521

Engineering Law

2

Required

TCE 513

Terotechnology

2

Elective

TCE 514

Structural Design III

4

Elective

TCE 515

Building Services Engineering

3

Elective

TIE 511

Engineering Management

3

Elective

TCE524

Advanced Structural Analysis

3

Elective

TCE525

Construction Engineering

3

Elective

Total Units: Compulsory = 21Units; Required =   23Units; Electives = 20Units

 

0       UNDERGRADUATE COURSE SYNOPSES

Course Code and Learning Outcomes

Course Title & Description

TWE 211

Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the course, students should be able to:

  1. Ability to define concrete and relevant terms describing Wood and Biomaterial Engineering as a discipline in the family of Engineering.

  2. Relate evolution of engineering profession to the relevance of Wood and Biomaterial Engineering discipline in the family of Engineering

  3. Identify wood and biomaterial with their capacity as industrial materials with their merits. 

  4. Discuss the contributions of wood and biomaterial to guarantying sustainability of raw material supply to industries.

  5. Identify relevant Job opportunities in the global Forest Products Industries

Introduction to Wood & Biomaterials Engineering

Definition of relevant terms-science, technology, engineering, wood science, wood technology, wood engineering, sustainable bioproducts, etc. A brief discussion on the evolution of the engineering profession; Current uses of wood &non-timber forest products (e.g., tall grasses like bamboo, palms like rattan & raffia, climbers like Cissus populnea, hemps, et c) and aquatic weeds) as industrial materials and the advantages; A survey of the forest products industries in Nigeria.  Job opportunities in the global Forest Products Industries.

HL: 30 (24/6); HP:0; U:2; CR:0 P:0

 

TWE 212

Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the course, students should be able to:

  1. Master Office Software Tools: Demonstrate proficiency in using popular software packages, including Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint, for word processing, data analysis, and report creation in Biomaterials Engineering tasks.

  2. Efficient Data Management: Effectively manage and manipulate data using spreadsheet software like Excel and apply principles of database management for Biomaterials Engineering applications.

  3. Digital Communication Skills: Utilize ICT tools for communication and collaboration, including email and internet services, to enhance information sharing and teamwork in Biomaterials Engineering projects.

  4. Problem-Solving with Programming: Apply computer programming concepts to solve Biomaterials Engineering challenges, developing problem-solving skills through hands-on exercises and practical applications.

  5. Mini-Project Proficiency: Successfully complete a mini-project that demonstrates the practical application of software tools and programming skills to address real-world Biomaterials Engineering problems.

 

 Computer Programming & ICT Applications in Biomaterials Engineering 

Principles of operation, applications, demonstrations, and practical hand-on exercises in word processing, spreadsheet (data) processing, database management, and report presentation using popular software packages, e.g., Microsoft WORD, EXCEL, PowerPoint, etc. Internet Services: Mini-project  to test proficiency in use of software packages.

HL: 15; HP:45; U:2; CR:0; P:0 

 

TWE 221

Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the course, students should be able to:

  1. Identify the different wood products industries and their processing techniques.

  2. Analyse the product manufacturing practices used in the wood products industries.

  3. Compare and contrast the advantages and disadvantages of different manufacturing practices in the wood products industry.

  4. Synthesize and report on the key findings from on-site studies of representative wood products industries visited.

  5. Develop skills in professional communication by preparing and delivering reports on the findings from the on-site studies.

  6. Evaluate the success of practitioners in the wood products industry and understand how their experiences and practices can inform product manufacturing.

  7. Develop critical thinking skills by analysing case studies of successful practitioners in the wood products industry.

  8. Apply knowledge gained from the course to propose improvements or innovations to product manufacturing practices in the wood products industry.

  9. Develop skills in teamwork and collaboration by working with other students in the supervised study and reporting activities.

  10. Develop self-management skills by effectively managing time and resources to complete the various course assignments and activities.

 

Field & Case Studies in Wood & Biomaterials Engineering 

On-site studies of wood products industries, processing techniques and product manufacturing practices. Supervised study and reporting on the representative wood products industries visited. Invitation of successful practitioners to provide case studies & mentor students.

HL:0; HP: 45; U:1 CR:0; P: TWE 211

 

TWE 311

Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the course, students should be able to:

i. Differentiate and compare the gross and microscopic structure and chemical composition of hardwoods, softwoods, bamboo, rattans, and emerging biomaterials of engineering significance.

ii. Analyse and quantify the variability, abnormal growth, shrinkage, swelling, permeability, natural defects, and bio-deterioration phenomena in wood and biomaterials.

iii. Investigate the influence of density, moisture content, and temperature on the strength properties and practical applications of wood and allied biomaterials.

iv. Measure and assess the thermal, electrical, and acoustical properties of these biomaterials, applying the acquired knowledge in practical scenarios.

v. Apply the principles of thermodynamics to understand moisture sorption processes, including adsorption and desorption, within wood and allied biomaterials.

 

Basic Properties of Wood & Allied Biomaterials 

Gross and microscopic structure and chemical composition of wood-hardwoods, softwoods bamboo, rattans & emerging biomaterials of engineering importance.  Variability, abnormal growth, shrinkage and swelling, permeability, natural defects & bio-deterioration phenomena in wood & biomaterials. Effects of density, moisture content and temperature on strength properties and utilisation. Thermal, electrical, acoustical properties. Thermodynamics of moisture sorption including adsorption-desorption.

HL: 30; HP:45; U:3; CR:0; P:0 

 

TWE 312

Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the course, students should be able to:

i. Define and articulate key terms and concepts related to timber and non-timber forest product harvesting.

ii. Compare and contrast modern and traditional harvesting methods for timber and non-timber forest products, including rattans and bamboos.

iii. Evaluate and distinguish between harvesting practices in natural forests and forest plantations.

iv. Develop effective harvesting plans, considering ecological and sustainability factors.

v. Demonstrate competence in stump area operations, including techniques for minimizing environmental impact.

vi. Apply principles and elements of forest road design, construction, and maintenance to facilitate efficient and sustainable harvesting operations.

 

Harvesting of Timber and Non-Timber Forest Products       

Definition of basic terms and concepts associated with harvesting. Modern and traditional methods of harvesting timber and non-timber forest products such as rattans and bamboos. Harvesting in natural forests and forest plantations. Harvesting plans. Stump area operations. Elements of forest road design, construction and maintenance.

HL:30; HP:0; U:2; CR: 0; P:0 

 

TWE 313

Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the course, students should be able to:

  1. Identify the principal commercial tropical hardwoods, bamboos, and rattans based on their gross characteristics.

  2. Analyse the physical and chemical properties of tropical hardwoods, bamboos, and rattans to determine their suitability for specific uses.

  3. Utilize macroscopic and microscopic techniques to accurately identify tropical hardwoods, bamboos, and rattans.

  4. Demonstrate an understanding of the anatomical and morphological features of tropical hardwoods, bamboos, and rattans that facilitate their identification.

  5. Apply appropriate techniques for preparing and examining microscopic specimens of tropical hardwoods, bamboos, and rattans.

  6. Interpret and communicate findings from microscopic analyses of tropical hardwoods, bamboos, and rattans to other professionals in the field.

  7. Develop an appreciation for the ecological, economic, and cultural significance of tropical hardwoods, bamboos, and rattans, and the importance of sustainable management and conservation practices.

  8. Demonstrate attention to detail and precision in the identification of tropical hardwoods, bamboos, and rattans.

  9. Apply knowledge gained from the course to identify and classify new or unfamiliar tropical hardwoods, bamboos, and rattans encountered in the field.

  10. Develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills by identifying potential sources of error or ambiguity in the identification process and developing solutions to overcome them.

 

Wood & Biomaterial Identification 

Identification of principal commercial tropical hardwoods, bamboos & rattans based on gross characteristics. Emphasis on identification at the macroscopic and microscopic levels.

HL:0; HP:45; U:1; CR: TWE 311; P:0

 

TWE 321

Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the course, students should be able to:

  1. Develop an appreciation for the cultural and historical significance of wood and biomaterials in construction and understand how these materials have been used in different contexts throughout history

  2. Analyse the mechanical properties of wood and biomaterials, including their strength, stiffness, toughness, and durability, and understand how these properties influence their behaviour in structural applications

  3. Describe the anisotropic properties of wood and biomaterials, including how they affect stress and loading, and how to design for these properties

  4. Apply standard tests and stress calculations to evaluate the mechanical properties of wood and biomaterials and use this information to make informed decisions about design and use. Demonstrate proficiency in non-destructive testing techniques for wood and biomaterials, including ultrasound, acoustic emission, and other methods

  5. Describe the grading rules and standards used for sawn timber, bamboo, and rattans, and apply these rules to evaluate and select appropriate materials for specific structural applications

  6. Relate the concepts of creep and relaxation in wood and biomaterials, and how these phenomena can affect the long-term behaviour and performance of structures.

 

Mechanical Properties of Wood & Biomaterials

The mechanical properties of wood & biomaterials and their uses in structural applications.  Anisotropic properties of wood & biomaterials; standard tests and stress calculations, creep and relaxation.  Non-destructive testing.  Grading rules for sawn timber, bamboo & rattans.

HL: 30; HP:45; U:3; CR:0; P: TWE 311 

 

TWE 322

Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the course, students should be able to:

i. Understand the theory of cutting as it applies to wood and allied materials, including factors that affect cutting efficiency and quality.

ii. Evaluate the design principles of saws and cutters, applying knowledge to select appropriate cutting tools for specific applications.

iii. Demonstrate competence in the operation and maintenance of various sawmilling and re-sawing equipment, such as band saws, circular saws, gang saws, frame saws, and planers.

iv. Effectively use mill handling equipment to optimize workflow and productivity in wood and biomaterial processing.

v. Implement dust extraction systems to enhance safety and air quality within sawmills, adhering to environmental and health regulations.

 

Conversion Equipment for Wood & Biomaterials   

Theory of cutting in relation to wood and allied materials.  Design and saws and cutters.  Sawmilling and re-sawing equipment including band saw, circular saw, gang and frame saw, planner etc.  Mill handling equipment, dust extraction from sawmills. 

HL: 30 (24/6); HP:45; U:3; CR:0; P:TWE 311 

 

TWE 323

Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the course, students should be able to:

i. Explain the key principles of the biochemistry of wood and natural fibre formation.

ii. Evaluate the chemical properties of wood and natural fibres through laboratory tests and measurements.

iii. Identify and describe chemical reactions involving cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin in wood-based materials.

iv. Apply knowledge of fundamental chemical reactions to process wood and similar sustainable biomaterials effectively.

v. Analyse and recommend suitable wood modification techniques based on chemical considerations.

vi. Quantify and analyse wood/natural fibre-adhesive interactions using experimental data.

vii. Assess the impact of preservative chemicals on sustainable biomaterials and propose appropriate solutions.

viii. Devise strategies for the utilization of chemical by-products from sustainable biomaterials.

ix. Execute laboratory exercises proficiently, collect data, and draw scientifically sound conclusions.

 

Chemistry of Wood Products & Biomaterials 

The biochemistry of wood & natural fibre formation. Chemical properties of wood & natural fibres. The reaction chemistry of wood-based materials: chemical reactions involving cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin.  Fundamental chemical reactions involved in processing wood & similar sustainable biomaterials, wood modification, wood/natural fibre-adhesive interactions; interactions between sustainable biomaterials and preservative chemicals. Utilization of chemical bye-products of sustainable biomaterials.  Laboratory exercises.

HL: 15 (12/3); HP:45; U:2; CR: 0; P: TWE 311 

 

TWE 411

Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the course, students should be able to:

i. Identify and classify the various types of deterioration agents for wood, bamboos, and rattans, including fungi, insects, and marine borers.

ii. Analyse the mechanisms and consequences of decay caused by these organisms, considering the impact on material properties.

iii. Evaluate methods for preventing decay in wood and bioproducts, emphasizing both natural and chemical prevention techniques.

iv. Assess the effects of other agents of biomaterial degradation, such as fire, weathering, and discoloration, on wood and related materials.

v. Propose effective protection strategies against deterioration, including the selection and application of preservatives and preservation techniques.

vi. Examine the deterioration of composite materials in service and recommend preservation methods tailored to their specific needs.

vii. Apply acquired knowledge to real-world scenarios, demonstrating the ability to preserve wood and bioproducts efficiently and sustainably.

 

Biodeterioration & Preservation of Wood & Bioproducts

Deterioration of wood, bamboos and rattans by fungi, insects, and marine borers.  Types of decay organisms, decay condition mechanisms and consequences.  Special reference to the effects of decay on material properties and methods of decay prevention.  Other agents of biomaterial degradation: fire, weathering, discolorations. Protection against deterioration; chemicals used for preservation and techniques employed for applying preservatives.  Deterioration of composite materials in service and method of their preservation. 

HL:30; HP:45; U:3; CR:0; P: TWE 311 

 

TWE 412

Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the course, students should be able to:

  1. Analyse manufacturing processes, basic properties, and applications of panel products, including plywood, particleboard, fibreboard, Oriented Strand Board, Cement-Bonded Composites, and Modern Laminated Products.

  2. Evaluate the materials utilized in the production of panel products, considering their composition and characteristics.

  3. Apply testing methods to determine the basic and grade strength of each panel product.

  4. Assess the various uses of plywood, particleboard, fibreboard, Oriented Strand Board, Cement-Bonded Composites, and Modern Laminated Products in construction applications. 

 

Wood-Based Panel & Natural Fibre-Reinforced Composites

Manufacturing processes, basic properties and uses of panel products: plywood, particleboard, fibreboard, Oriented Strand Board, Cement--Bonded Composites, and Modern Laminated Products. A review of the materials for the production of these products.  Methods of testing and determination of basic and grade strength of each product. Uses of each product in construction. HL:30; HP:45; U:3; CR:0; P:0

 

TWE 413

Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the course, students should be able to:

  1. Analyse the environmental, social, and political aspects related to logging, preservative treatments, and the production and utilization of sustainable bioproducts, including lumber, pulp, paper, plywood, particleboard, and charcoal.

  2. Assess the environmental consequences of forest products industries on soil, water bodies, and the atmosphere, focusing on their ecological impact.

  3. Examine the concept of life cycle analysis in the context of sustainable bioproducts, considering their environmental footprint throughout their entire life cycle.

  4. Introduce the fundamentals of Environmental Impact Assessment, defining its significance and importance in evaluating the environmental impact of various processes and products.

  5. Explore the concepts of forest certification and eco-labelling and their role in promoting sustainable forestry practices and consumer awareness.

  6. Investigate recycling practices in the context of sustainable bioproducts, emphasizing their role in reducing waste and promoting a circular economy.

 

Environment, Society & the Use of Sustainable Bioproducts

Examination of the environmental, social and political issues surrounding logging, preservative treatments & the manufacture and use of sustainable bioproducts- lumber, pulp & paper, plywood, particleboard, & charcoal.  Emphasis is placed on the impact of the forest products industries on environment (soil, water bodies, & the atmosphere). Other topics will include: life cycle analysis of sustainable bioproducts; An introduction to Environmental Impact Assessment-definition, significance & importance; Forest certification & eco-labelling; recycling. 

HL:30; HP:45; U:3; CR:0; P:0

 

TWE 414

Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the course, students should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate understanding of the various Bioenergy Production Technologies

  2. Analyse the Pros and Cons of the various Bioenergy Production 

  3. Develop an understanding of traditional and modern charcoal production processes, highlighting their benefits and drawbacks.

  4. Demonstrate hands-on proficiency in some of the Bioenergy Production Technologies through practical and or fieldwork.

  5. Analyse real-world case studies and emerging trends of Bioenergy Production Technologies and propose solutions to overcome challenges or improve existing processes.

  6. Identify opportunities for innovation and optimization of Bioenergy Production Technologies

  7. Evaluate sustainability and efficiency of biofuel production facilities during fieldtrip.

  8. Understand the ethical considerations surrounding biomass conversion, its impact on the environment and sustainable practices.

 

Bioenergy Production Technologies

A review of the basic mechanical, biological, chemical and thermal processes for converting biomass into biofuels, e.g., briquetting, pelletization, biodigestion to produce biogas, trans-esterification to produce biodiesel, fermentation & alcohol distillation to produce bioethanol, gasification, and pyrolysis (i.e., torrefaction, carbonisation and full pyrolysis), etc.  A review of traditional and modern charcoal production processes.   A discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of the various technologies. Practical demonstration of the technologies and field visits to installation sites.

HL:30; HP:45; U:3; CR:0; P: TWE 414

 

TWE 415

Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the course, students should be able to:

  1. Explore the historical evolution and significant milestones in furniture production.

  2. Review the wooden and rattan furniture industry in Nigeria, examining its current status and trends.

  3. Classify furniture and furniture products into categories such as home, office, school, and laboratory furnishings.

  4. Study the principles of furniture design, including ergonomics and anthropometry, to create comfortable and functional pieces.

  5. Develop skills in draughtsmanship and learn basic structural analysis equations for furniture frames and joints.

  6. Focus on ergonomic design principles for modern furniture, emphasizing sustainable materials like wood, plywood, bamboo, and rattans.

  7. Master techniques for bending furniture framing members, considering the unique characteristics of each material.

  8. Prepare material and cutting lists and understand costing as preliminary steps in furniture design.

  9. Explore furniture framing, jointing, adhesives, and production processes, along with the tools, equipment, and machines used in the industry.

  10. Complete practical design exercises, utilizing both manual methods and computer software packages to create furniture prototypes and designs.

Introduction to Furniture Analysis &Design 

Historical evolution & landmarks in furniture production; A review of the wooden and rattan furniture industry in Nigeria. Classification of furniture & furniture products (home, office, school, laboratory, et c). Furniture design principles- ergonomics and anthropometry; Draughtsmanship; Basic equations for structural analysis of furniture frames/joints; Ergonomic design of modern furniture based on sustainable bioproducts such as wood, plywood, bamboo and rattans. Techniques for bending furniture framing members. Preliminaries in furniture design- material & cutting list preparation, and costing. Furniture framing, jointing, adhesives, and production processes, tools/equipment/machines. Simple design exercises using manual methods and computer software packages.

HL:30; HP:45; U:3; CR:0; P: TWE 311

 

TWE 416

Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the course, students should be able to:

  1. Examine the structure and properties of polymers and natural fibers, with a focus on the impact of chemical structure on key polymer properties, including crystallinity, viscosity, and elasticity.

  2. Investigate the structural factors that influence the mechanical properties of polymers, providing insights into how molecular structure affects material strength and performance.

  3. Introduce the concept of natural fibre reinforcement and explore crosslinking and co-polymerization techniques used to modify polymer properties.

  4. Evaluate the property requirements and utilization of elastomers, considering their unique characteristics and applications.

 

Polymer and Fibre Chemistry  

Structure and properties of polymers and natural fibres; effect of chemical structure on selected properties of polymers such as crystallinity; viscosity, elasticity, etc. structural determinants of mechanical properties; introduction to natural fibre reinforcement, crosslinking, co-polymerisation; property requirements and utilisation, elastomers.

HL:30; HP:0; U:2; CR: 0; P:

 

TWE 417

Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the course, students should be able to:

i. Summarize the historical development of interior design, identifying key milestones and influential movements.

ii. Apply principles of colour theory to create effective colour schemes for interior design projects.

iii. Identify and describe fundamental interior design materials, including wood, wallpaper, textiles, mosaic tiles, carpets, and more.

iv. Differentiate between various floor and wall finishes and their appropriate applications in interior design.

v. Explain the rationale behind using finishing materials in buildings and structures, considering both functional and aesthetic aspects.

vi. Analyse factors that influence the selection of finishing materials, such as cost, durability, sustainability, and design goals.

vii. Classify and compare different types of finishes applied to wood surfaces in interior design, including waxes, shellac, drying oils, lacquers, varnishes, and paints, based on their properties and applications.

 

Interior Design Materials & Processes I

A brief history of interior design. Colour theory. Basic materials for interior design, e.g., wood, wallpaper, textiles, mosaic tiles, carpets, etc. Floor & wall finishes. Reasons for using finishing materials in buildings and structures. Factors involved in selecting a finishing material. Types of finishes applied to wood surfaces in interior design, e.g., waxes, shellacdrying oilslacquersvarnishes, paints, etc.

HL:30; HP:0; U:2; CR: 0; P:

 

TWE 511

Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the course, students should be able to:

  1. Understand the basic theory of structures and its application to sustainable bioproducts, including considerations of elastic and non-elastic deformations in relation to wood and other biomaterials.

  2. Understand the general requirements for structural design, including load-bearing capacity, safety, durability, and serviceability.

  3. Identify the different types of structural loads and their effects on sustainable bioproducts, including dead loads, live loads, wind loads, and seismic loads.

  4. Understand the standard (nominal) dimensions and strength grouping of timber and bamboo species, as well as the modification factors used to account for variations in strength and stiffness.

  5. Apply the principles of structural design to the design of solid and built-up beams, including glue-laminated beams and stressed skin panels, using industry-standard codes and standards.

  6. Understand the practical uses of computer and proprietary software programs for structural design, including 2D and 3D modelling, analysis, and optimization.

  7. Develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills by analysing and evaluating different approaches to structural design with sustainable bioproducts and identifying strategies for improving performance, durability, and sustainability.

  8. Develop communication skills by effectively presenting technical information about structural design with sustainable bioproducts to other professionals in the field.

  9. Demonstrate proficiency in laboratory skills and techniques by performing experiments to measure the properties of sustainable bioproducts and evaluate their performance in structural applications.

  10. Understand the role of structural design with sustainable bioproducts in the global construction industry and the potential for sustainable bioproducts to contribute to sustainable development and environmental conservation.

 

Structural Design with Wood & Biomaterials I 

Basic theory of structures including considerations of elastic and non-elastic deformations in relation to wood and other biomaterials.  General requirements for structural designs.  Types of structural Loads. Standard (nominal) dimensions & strength grouping of timber and bamboo species.  Modification factors.  Design of solid and built-up beams, including glue-laminated beams & stressed skin panels.  Practical uses of the computer and proprietary software programs for structural design.

HL:30 (24/6); HP:45; U:3; CR: 0; P: TME 214, TME 225,TCE 313

 

TWE 512

Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the course, students should be able to:

  1. Identify the various stages of product development and promotion, including market research, product design, branding, and advertising.

  2. Analyse the end-use patterns for sustainable bioproducts and identify potential new markets and applications.

  3. Evaluate the quality standards for sustainable bioproducts and assess the applications of statistical quality control techniques in the lumber, composites, panel products, and pulp/paper industries.

  4. Understand the principles of log and lumber grading and measurement, including visual grading rules and machine grading methods.

  5. Develop the skills to determine lumber target sizes, control limits, and tolerance limits based on industry standards and customer requirements.

  6. Understand the principles and procedures for product inspection and certification, including third-party certification schemes like Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) and Sustainable Forestry Initiative (SFI).

  7. Explore marketing techniques for sustainable bioproducts, including pricing strategies, distribution channels, and promotional campaigns.

  8. Analyse the distribution system for sustainable bioproducts, including transportation, storage, and handling, and understand the associated costs and challenges.

Quality Control of Wood Products 

Product development and promotion.  End-use patterns for sustainable bioproducts.  Quality standards and the applications of statistical quality control techniques in lumber, composites, panel products and pulp/paper industries. Principles of log and lumber grading and measurement.    Determination of lumber target sizes, control and tolerance limits.  Product inspection and certification. 

HL:30 (24/6); HP:45;U:3;CR: 0; P:0

 

TWE 513

Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the course, students should be able to:

  1. Identify and compare the gross, microscopic molecular and ultrastructural composition of hardwoods, softwoods, and other biomaterials of engineering significance.

  2. Apply the understanding of anisotropy on moisture sorption processes, including adsorption and desorption, shrinkage and swelling within wood and allied biomaterials.

  3. Investigate the influence of density, moisture content, and temperature on the strength properties and practical applications of wood and allied biomaterials.

  4. Measure and assess the thermal, electrical, and acoustical properties of these biomaterials, applying the acquired knowledge in practical scenarios such as wood in service

  5. Analyse and quantify the effect of variability, abnormal growth in wood and allied biomaterials, natural defects, and bio-deterioration phenomena in the use of wood and biomaterials as an engineering material.

 

Drying of Wood & Biomaterials

Principles of heat transfer, humidification and drying: importance of drying wood and other biomaterials, types of kilns, methods of drying, kiln features, drying schedules, drying defects, log and lumber storage, energy requirements for drying. Introduction to solar drying principles and techniques. Practical exercises on the design of simple drying systems/facilities. 

HL:30 (24/6); HP:45; U:3; CR: 0; P:TWE 311

 

TWE 514

Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the course, students should be able to:

  1. Identify and compare the gross, microscopic molecular and ultrastructural composition of hardwoods, softwoods, and other biomaterials of engineering significance.

  2. Apply the understanding of anisotropy on moisture sorption processes, including adsorption and desorption, shrinkage and swelling within wood and allied biomaterials.

  3. Investigate the influence of density, moisture content, and temperature on the strength properties and practical applications of wood and allied biomaterials.

  4. Measure and assess the thermal, electrical, and acoustical properties of these biomaterials, applying the acquired knowledge in practical scenarios such as wood in service

  5. Analyse and quantify the effect of variability, abnormal growth in wood and allied biomaterials, natural defects, and bio-deterioration phenomena in the use of wood and biomaterials as an engineering material.

 

Pulp Manufacturing & Its Derivatives 

The chemical and technological principles of manufacturing pulps from various lignocelluloses including wood, grasses (e.g., bamboo) and other biomaterials.  Fundamental processes adopted in the pulping industry including material procurement and preparation, et c.  Chemical, semi-chemical and mechanical pulping.  Complete tree utilization in the manufacture of pulp.  Environmental pollution and water problems associated with liquid effluents from pulping processes.

HL:30 (24/6); HP:45;U:3;CR: 0; P:TWE 311

 

TWE 515

Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the course, students should be able to:

i. Apply principles for the design and operation of sawmills, encompassing the entire process from log sorting yard to green lumber production.

ii. Utilize methods to accurately estimate lumber yield and mill residues, considering advanced wood sawing techniques.

iii. Demonstrate proficiency in processing and finishing wood products within the context of sawmilling systems.

iv. Execute fabrication, assembly, and repair tasks for machine components commonly used in sawmills.

v. Analyse and address issues related to vibration and noise in sawmilling operations, implementing effective mitigation strategies.

vi. Identify causes of saw buckling during wood conversion and employ preventive measures to ensure efficient processing.

vii. Familiarize with sawing optimization systems and process control techniques, optimizing lumber production.

viii. Apply cost accounting principles and conduct investment analysis to assess the economic viability of sawmilling systems and projects.

 

Sawmilling Systems

Principles for the design and operation of sawmills from the log sorting yard to the green lumber stage.  Methods of estimating lumber yield and mill residues; Advanced techniques of wood sawing. Processing and finishing of wood. Fabrication, assemblage and repairs of machine components. Vibration and noise in sawmills.  Buckling of saw during wood conversion: causes and methods of prevention. Introduction to sawing optimization systems and process control. Cost accounting and investment analysis 

HL:30; HP:45;U:3;CR: 0; P: TWE 311, TWE 322

TWE 516

Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the course, students should be able to:

  1. Explain the basic principles of adhesive theory, including the essential and desirable requirements for adhesives used in the sustainable bioproducts industry.

  2. Classify the different types of adhesives used in the production of glulam, scarf, and finger joints and their corresponding uses.

  3. Analyse the behaviour of glued joints under different loading conditions and determine the best adhesive to use for specific applications.

  4. Identify the various sealants and coatings used in the handicraft, furniture, and building construction industries, and explain their applications.

  5. Perform laboratory exercises to identify different adhesive and coating materials, apply them using appropriate methods, and evaluate their performance.

  6. Evaluate the environmental impact of adhesives and finishes used in the sustainable bioproducts industry and recommend sustainable alternatives.

 

Adhesives & Finishes for Sustainable Bioproducts Manufacturing

Adhesive theory, essential and desirable requirements for adhesives utilized for sustainable bioproducts including wood, bamboo and rattans employed for structural and non-structural purposes. Types and classifications of adhesives for the production of glulam, scarf and finger joints.  Behaviour of glued joints under loading. Sealants and coatings used in the handicraft, furniture and building construction industries, laboratory exercises: identification of materials, methods of application and methods of evaluating the materials.

HL:30 (24/6); HP:45; U:3;CR: 0; P:0

 

TWE 517

Learning Outcomes: By the end of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Explain the need for energy products, identify global energy sources and distribution, and discuss future trends in energy product exploitation.

  2. Evaluate biomass availability and potential sources, including traditional biomass energy crops and fuel wood species, and describe their characteristics.

  3. Define primary biomass energy products and their contributions towards energy supply, and review biomass materials characterization methods including proximate and ultimate analyses and heating values.

  4. Explain the meaning and determination of lower and higher heating values and describe the principles and methods of calorimetry including bomb calorimeter and gas calorimeter.

  5. Identify general chemical structural formulae for biomass materials, and describe secondary biomass energy products and by-products, including their need and methods of production.

  6. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of harnessing solar energy for drying wood and other bioproducts, water heating, lighting, and cooking.

  7. Design and fabricate solar energy collectors and describe the uses of wood and allied bioproducts in fabricating solar cookers, heaters, and driers.

 

Bioenergy Engineering I

The need for energy products; global energy sources and distribution; future trends in energy products exploitation; biomass availability and potentials; traditional biomass energy crops; fuel wood species & their characteristics; primary biomass energy products-definition, chemical composition,  current biomass energy products and their contributions towards energy supply; review of biomass materials characterisation-  proximate and ultimate analyses, Heating values- lower and higher heating value meanings & determination; secondary biomass energy products & by-products -definition, need for secondary energy products Methods of harnessing solar energy for drying wood and other bioproducts, water heating, lighting and cooking; advantages and disadvantages of solar energy utilisation; the uses of wood products in fabricating solar cookers, heaters and driers .

HL:30; HP:0; U:2;CR: 0; P:TME 213; TWE 414

 

TWE 521

Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the course, students should be able to:

i. Explain the chemical and technological principles underlying the entire paper manufacturing process, from fibre furnish preparation to the final drying stage.

ii. Analyse the processes of bleaching, refining, sheet forming, filling, sizing, colouring, and coating in paper manufacturing, considering their impacts on paper quality and properties.

iii. Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of paper machinery operating variables and their influence on the manufacturing process.

iv. Apply acquired knowledge to optimize paper production, ensuring the efficient and consistent manufacturing of high-quality paper products.

v. Evaluate and recommend process improvements and innovations in paper manufacturing technology based on an in-depth understanding of the principles and variables involved.

 

Paper Manufacturing Technology 

The chemical and technological principles of paper manufacturing from the preparation of fibre furnishes to the final stage of drying; including bleaching, refining, sheet forming, filling, sizing, colouring and coating.  Paper machinery operating variables. 

HL:30 (24/6); HP:45;U:3;CR: 0; P:TWE 514

 

TWE 522

Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the course, students should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of conventional and non-conventional building materials, including their properties, benefits, and limitations.

  2. Analyse the sources of biomass and natural fibres used in the manufacture of non-conventional composite building products and evaluate their sustainability and environmental impact.

  3. Evaluate the different types of bonding in composite products, including physical, mechanical, chemical, and multiple bonding, and explain their effects on the mechanical and environmental stability of the products.

  4. Conduct mechanical and environmental stability tests on natural fibre-reinforced composites and interpret the results to assess the performance and suitability of the materials for different applications.

  5. Apply the knowledge and skills gained in the course to produce non-conventional natural fibre-reinforced floor, wall, ceiling, and roof tiles, using appropriate production methods and testing techniques.

  6. Assess the sustainability and environmental impact of non-conventional natural fibre-reinforced building materials and compare them to conventional materials to determine their suitability for different construction projects.

  7. Communicate effectively about sustainable building materials, including the benefits, limitations, and practical applications of non-conventional natural fibre-reinforced composites.

 

Introduction to Sustainable Building Materials

A review of the concepts of conventional & non-conventional building materials. Sources of biomass and natural fibres used in the manufacture of non-conventional composite building products. Types of bonding in composite products-physical, mechanical, chemical & multiple bonding; Mechanical and environmental stability tests on natural fibre –reinforced composites. Practical sessions on the production & testing of non-conventional natural fibre-reinforced floor, wall, ceiling and roof tiles.

HL:30; HP:45;U:2;CR: 0; P:TWE 412

 

TWE 523

Learning Outcomes: By the end of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Define the concept of interior design and explain its role in creating functional, aesthetic, and comfortable living spaces.

  2. Develop effective interior design proposals, including determining client needs, creating design concepts, and presenting proposals to clients.

  3. Apply the basic principles of interior design, including unity and harmony, balance, focal point rhythm, and details, to create cohesive and visually appealing interior spaces.

  4. Analyse and incorporate the seven elements of interior design, including space, line, form, light, colour, texture, and pattern, to create functional and aesthetically pleasing interior designs.

  5. Understand the process of starting an interior design business, including business planning, marketing, and managing client relationships.

  6. Develop practical skills in project management, including time management, budgeting, and communication with clients and contractors.

  7. Demonstrate critical thinking and problem-solving skills to address real-world challenges in interior design, such as design constraints, client requirements, and project limitations.

  8. Communicate effectively with clients, contractors, and other stakeholders involved in interior design projects, using professional language, visual aids, and other communication tools.

  9. Analyse and evaluate interior design projects, using a range of criteria such as functionality, aesthetics, sustainability, and user satisfaction.

  10. Apply ethical and professional standards in interior design practice, including respect for client preferences, cultural diversity, and environmental sustainability.

Interior Design Materials & Processes II

The concept of interior design. How to prepare interior design proposals. The basic principles of interior designing- unity & harmony, balance, focal point rhythm, and details. The 7 elements of interior design: space, line, forms, light, colour, texture, pattern. How to start an interior design business.

 HL:30; HP:0;U:3;CR: 0; P:TWE 417

TWE 524

Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the course, students should be able to:

  1. Understand the properties, benefits, and limitations of wood and bamboo as sustainable building materials and evaluate their suitability for different structural applications.

  2. Apply design principles and standards for the design of solid columns, spaced columns, glulam columns, and trusses fabricated with wood, bamboo, and other biomaterials.

  3. Analyse and apply modification factors for duration of load, as well as other design considerations, in the design of wood and bamboo structural elements.

  4. Evaluate the selection, design, and performance of mechanical fasteners such as nails, spikes, screws, bolts, metal plate connectors, and special brackets and hinges, in the context of wood and bamboo structures.

  5. Apply computer applications to the design process, including modelling and simulation tools, to enhance the accuracy and efficiency of wood and bamboo structural design.

  6. Conduct tests to evaluate the performance and durability of wood and bamboo structural elements and interpret the results to optimize design specifications and construction techniques.

  7. Communicate effectively about wood and bamboo structures, including the benefits, limitations, and practical applications of these materials in structural design.

  8. Evaluate and compare the environmental and economic sustainability of different wood and bamboo structural materials and designs, considering factors such as material availability, carbon footprint, and lifecycle cost.

  9. Apply ethical and professional standards in the design process, including respect for client preferences, cultural diversity, and environmental sustainability.

  10. Collaborate effectively in interdisciplinary teams, including architects, engineers, builders, and other stakeholders, to develop and implement innovative wood and bamboo structural design solutions.

 

Structural Design with Wood & Biomaterials II 

Design of solid columns with sustainable bioproducts such as wood and bamboo based on.  Modification factors for duration of load. Design of spaced columns, glulam columns. Design of mechanical fasteners; nails, spikes, screws, bolts, & metal plate connectors, special brackets and hinges for use in wood and bamboo structures.  Design of trusses fabricated with wood, bamboo and other biomaterials.   Computer applications in column and connector design processes.

HL:30 (24/6); HP:45;U:3;CR: 0; P: TME 214, TME 225,TCE 313

 

TWE 525

Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the course, students should be able to:

  1. Understand the mathematical principles underlying sustainable bioproducts manufacturing systems and apply them to model production processes.

  2. Develop and interpret flowcharts to describe the steps involved in production processes and read and write computer code to implement algorithms for sequencing and looping.

  3. Use programming languages such as FORTRAN and MATLAB, and software packages such as Excel and LINGO, to solve optimization, assignment, transportation, job sequencing, and queuing problems in sustainable bioproducts manufacturing.

  4. Understand and apply discrete-event and Monte Carlo simulation methods to model and analyse the performance of wood and biomaterial processing operations.

  5. Develop computer programs for modelling and simulating sustainable bioproducts manufacturing processes and evaluate the performance of these programs.

  6. Apply optimization techniques to identify and analyse the trade-offs between different process variables, such as cost, quality, and sustainability.

  7. Evaluate the accuracy and validity of simulation models and computer programs and interpret the results to inform decision-making in sustainable bioproducts manufacturing.

  8. Communicate effectively about the benefits and limitations of different modelling and simulation methods for sustainable bioproducts manufacturing and understand their practical applications in industry.

  9. Collaborate effectively in interdisciplinary teams, including engineers, scientists, and managers, to develop and implement sustainable bioproducts manufacturing solutions that balance economic, environmental, and social objectives.

  10. Apply ethical and professional standards in the development and application of computer models and simulations, including transparency, accountability, and respect for privacy and intellectual property rights.

 

Computer Modelling Applications in Wood Products Engineering

Mathematical formulations and modelling of sustainable bioproducts manufacturing systems. A brief review of simple computer coding procedures- flow chatting, imputing and reading data from computer screens and files, algorithms for sequencing and looping (DO LOOP, GOTO Statements), & Arrays  . Manual computation & the use of computer programs (e.g., FORTRAN, & MATLAB) and software (e.g., Excel & LINGO) in solving optimization, assignment, transportation, job sequencing & queuing problems. Discrete-event and Monte Carlo simulation of wood and biomaterial processing operation using manual and computer simulation methods. Development of individual programs.

HL:30; HP:45; U:3; CR: 0; P: TME 214

 

TWE 526

Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the "Furniture Manufacturing with Sustainable Bioproducts" course, students should be able to:

  1. Understand the range of sustainable bioproducts used in furniture manufacturing, including solid wood, lumber, panel products, rattans, bamboo, and other materials, and evaluate their properties and suitability for different furniture applications.

  2. Apply batch and continuous production techniques to furniture manufacturing, including the use of automation, jigs, and fixtures for improved efficiency and productivity.

  3. Design and optimize furniture production layouts, considering factors such as space utilization, workflow, and safety.

  4. Select appropriate upholstery materials and techniques for furniture design, including padding, fabrics, and other coverings, and evaluate their performance characteristics.

  5. Understand the principles of furniture finishing, including the selection and application of stains, lacquers, and varnishes, and evaluate their environmental impact.

  6. Develop and implement safety protocols and procedures for furniture manufacturing, including risk assessment, hazard identification, and personal protective equipment.

  7. Use computer software such as Auto-Cad, Pro-100 furniture Design, Sweet Home, and other programs for furniture design and optimization.

  8. Collaborate effectively in interdisciplinary teams, including designers, engineers, and production managers, to develop and implement sustainable furniture manufacturing solutions that balance economic, environmental, and social objectives.

  9. Understand and apply ethical and professional standards in furniture manufacturing, including transparency, accountability, and respect for privacy and intellectual property rights.

  10. Communicate effectively about sustainable furniture manufacturing practices and technologies and understand their impact on the broader context of the furniture industry and society.

 

Furniture Manufacturing with Sustainable Bioproducts

Batch & continuous furniture production with sustainable bioproducts- solid wood, lumber, panel products, rattans, bamboo, et c..  Layout design for furniture production plants. Advanced manufacturing techniques for producing furniture and cabinets including the design, production and use of jigs and fixtures for automated processing. Introduction to upholstered furniture design and material selection- padding, fabrics & other covering materials, etc. Furniture finishing operations & materials- stains, lacquers, and vanishes- and application methods. Safety rules and precautions. Computer software for furniture design- Auto-Cad, Pro-100 furniture Design, Sweet Home, etc. 

HL:30; HP:45;U:3;CR: 0; P: TWE 511 

 

TWE 527

Learning Outcomes: By the end of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Understand and define basic terms and concepts related to energy, environment, and climate change, including renewable energy, energy conservation, greenhouse gases, climate change, and global warming.

  2. Analyse historical trends in energy consumption and understand their environmental impacts.

  3. Identify and describe primary forms of fossil fuels (coal, oil, natural gas) and renewable energy sources such as wind, tidal, solar, hydro, biomass, and geothermal.

  4. Discuss the link between fossil fuel consumption and climate change, including the greenhouse effect and the role of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases.

  5. Evaluate potential impacts of global warming, including sea level rise, extreme weather events, and impacts on ecosystems and human health.

  6. Evaluate potential environmental impacts of renewable energy products, including their production, operation, and disposal.

  7. Explain international negotiations and agreements on climate change mitigation, including the Kyoto protocol, the UNFCCC, and CITES.

  8. Analyse case studies of climate change mitigation projects, including both successful and unsuccessful examples.

  9. Develop and propose solutions for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and mitigating the impacts of climate change.

  10. Demonstrate proficiency in using relevant computer tools and resources for analysing and modelling energy systems and environmental impacts.

Energy, Environment & Climate Change

An explorative discussion of basic terms & concepts, e.g., renewable energy, energy conservation, greenhouse gases, climate change, global warming, etc. Historical trends in energy consumption. Primary forms of fossil fuels (coal, oil, natural gas) & renewable energy- wind, tidal, solar, hydro, biomass, geothermal, etc. The link between fossil fuel consumption & climate change. Potential impacts of global warming. Potential environmental impacts of renewable energy products.   International negotiations & agreements on climate change mitigation (Kyoto protocol, UNFCCC, CITES, et c.) Case studies on climate change mitigation projects.

HL:30; HP:0; U:2; CR: 0; P:0

 

TWE 528

Learning Outcomes: By the end of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Define and explain the concept of global carbon pools and reservoirs, and the carbon cycle.

  2. Understand the principles of carbon accounting and calculate carbon footprint.

  3. Explain the importance of carbon sequestration and identify different methods to increase carbon storage in forest ecosystems.

  4. Evaluate measures to mitigate carbon footprint, such as the carbon tax concept, and assess their effectiveness.

  5. Analyse case studies of carbon stock management in different contexts and draw conclusions based on their findings.

  6. Develop a critical understanding of the challenges and opportunities in managing carbon stocks and identify strategies to address them.

 

Carbon Stocks Management

Global carbon pools/reservoirs; Carbon cycle & carbon accounting; Carbon sequestration; Carbon storage in forest ecosystems; Calculation of carbon footprint; Measures to mitigate carbon footprint, e.g., the carbon tax concept; Case study evaluations.

HL:30; HP:0; U:2; CR: 0; P:0

 

TWE 529

Learning Outcomes: By the end of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Understand the fundamental concepts of polymerization and the various types of plastics.

  2. Identify the differences between linear and cross-linked polymers, and how their structures affect material properties.

  3. Explain the effects of additives on polymers, including plasticizers and stabilizers.

  4. Describe the deformation and failure mechanisms of plastics under different loading conditions.

  5. Analyse the properties and applications of wood as a polymeric material.

  6. Understand the manufacturing processes for wood plastics and fibre-reinforced plastics.

  7. Apply the techniques used for characterizing the properties of polymer-based products, including mechanical testing and microscopy.

Introduction to Polymer Engineering

Definitions of basic terms; polymerization; types of plastics; linear polymers and cross-linked polymers; Effects of polymer structures on the properties of materials; addition to polymers; deformation of plastics; Wood as polymeric material; Manufacturing processes for wood plastics and fibre-reinforced plastics. Product characterisation.

HL:30; HP:45; U:3; CR: 0; P:0

 

TWE 530

Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the course, students should be able to:

  1. Identify and describe the types and sources of pollutants generated in forest products industries, including liquid effluents, air-borne pollutant emissions, noise, and heat radiation.

  2. Analyse the potential impacts of pollutants on human health, the environment, and natural resources, such as water and soil.

  3. Evaluate industrial solid waste disposal methods and their impacts on the environment.

  4. Understand the BOD/COD concept of pollution load estimation in effluent discharge and analyse the treatment methods for liquid effluents.

  5. Describe the removal mechanisms for air-borne pollutants and evaluate other pollution control technologies in the forest products industries, including recycling.

  6. Understand and apply liquid effluent discharge standards and air-borne pollutant limits in the context of forest products industries.

  7. Analyse the concept of zero pollution and evaluate its relevance to forest products industries.

  8. Understand the environmental conservation policies in Nigeria and their impact on forest products industries.

 

Pollution Control in the Forest Products Industries 

Types & sources of pollutants in forest products industries- liquid effluents, air-borne pollutant emissions by forest products industries, noise, heat radiation. Industrial solid wastes from wood-based industries & disposal methods; BOD/COD concept of pollution load estimation in effluent discharge; treatment methods for liquid effluents; removal mechanisms fir air-borne pollutants; other pollution control technologies in the forest products industries, including recycling; liquid effluent discharge standards; air-borne pollutant limits; the concept of zero pollution; environmental conservation policies in Nigeria.

HL:30; HP:0;U:2;CR: 0; P:0

 

TWE 531

Learning Outcomes: By the end of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Explain the basic terms related to energy, combustion, and thermal efficiency.

  2. Analyse the chemistry of combustion, including chemical equilibrium and balanced reactions.

  3. Perform combustion calculations for different types of fuels, such as gas, liquid, and solid fuels.

  4. Determine the theoretical air/fuel ratio and stoichiometric air requirements for a given combustion process.

  5. Evaluate the by-products of combustion and their significance in bioenergy systems.

  6. Evaluate the survey of biomass combustion stoves used in sub-Saharan Africa.

  7. Design improved biomass cook stoves for increased combustion and heat transfer efficiencies.

  8. Calculate heat losses and thermal efficiencies of cook stoves.

  9. Perform water boiling and other efficiency tests for cook stoves.

  10. Analyse the economics of bioenergy utilization and its impact on the environment.

 

Bioenergy Engineering II

Definition of basic terms: energy, stove, thermal efficiency, combustion efficiency, etc.   Chemistry of combustion-chemical equilibrium and balance of reactions; combustion calculations for different fuels; Gas, liquid and solid fuel combustion; Theoretical air/ fuel ratio and stoichiometric air requirements; combustion by-products; stoichiometric calculations and their significance., A survey of biomass combustion stoves in use across sub-Saharan Africa; Design of improved biomass cook stoves, i.e., design of firewood & charcoal stoves for increased combustion and heat transfer efficiencies; Computation of heat losses in, and thermal efficiencies of cook stoves. Water boiling & other efficiency tests for cook stoves. Economics of bioenergy utilisation; environmental issues.

HL:30; HP:0; U:2; CR: 0; P: TME 213; TWE 414, TWE 517

 

TWE 532

Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the course, students should be able to:

  1. Identify the sources and causes of wood and biomaterial waste in forest products industries.

  2. Analyse the characteristics of biomass waste including its composition, moisture content, particle size, heat value, bulk density, mechanical properties, biodegradability, etc.

  3. Understand the concept of 4Rs (Reduction, Reuse, Recycling, & Recovery) in the management of wood and biomaterial waste.

  4. Apply the 4Rs approach to the management of wood and biomaterial waste in forest products industries.

  5. Evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of waste-to-energy and waste-to-wealth projects.

  6. Participate in industrial visits to gain hands-on experience in wood and biomaterial waste management.

Wood & Biomaterial Waste Management 

Definitions. Waste generation in forest products industries. Biomass waste characterisation-composition, moisture content, particle size, heat value, bulk density, mechanical properties, biodegradability, etc. A review of the concept of 4Rs in biomass waste management- Reduction, Reuse, Recycling, & Recovery. Practical examples of 4R implementation in wood and Biomaterial Engineering industries. Technical & economic considerations in waste-to-energy & waste-to-wealth projects. Industrial visits.

HL:30; HP:0; U:2; CR: 0; P:0

 

TWE 533

Learning Outcomes: By the end of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Understand the definition and concept of rheology and its importance in the study of wood and allied biomaterials.

  2. Examine the creep behaviour of wood, wood-based composites, and allied biomaterials under different loading conditions and time scales.

  3. Evaluate the effects of temperature and relative humidity on the short- and long-term responses of wood, wood composites, rattans, bamboo, and allied biomaterials to constant and stepwise loading conditions.

  4. Analyse the correspondence principle and its applications in the rheology of wood and allied biomaterials.

  5. Apply creep models to describe and predict the deformation behaviour of wood and allied biomaterials under different loading conditions and time scales.

  6. Develop an understanding of the role of rheology in the design and optimization of wood-based products and biomaterials.

Rheology of Wood & Biomaterials

Definition & concept of rheology. Creep behaviour of wood, wood-based composites, and allied biomaterials. Effects of temperature and relative humidity on short- and long-term responses of wood, wood composites, rattans, bamboo, and allied biomaterials to constant and stepwise loading conditions. Correspondence principle. Creep models.

HL:30; HP:0; U:2; CR: 0; P: TWE 311

 

TWE 534

Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the course, students should be able to:

  1. Understand the concept of non-destructive testing and its advantages and limitations.

  2. Identify different non-destructive testing methods used in the evaluation of wood and allied biomaterials.

  3. Compare and contrast the basic principles, advantages, limitations, and applications of different non-destructive testing methods.

  4. Understand the selection factors for specific non-destructive testing methods.

  5. Apply non-destructive testing methods to evaluate the quality and properties of wood and allied biomaterials.

  6. Analyse and interpret non-destructive testing results to make informed decisions regarding the quality and suitability of wood and allied biomaterials for specific applications.

Non-Destructive Testing of Wood & Biomaterials

Introduction to the concept of non-destructive testing (NDT). Advantages & limitations of NDT. Basic principles, advantages, limitations, and applications of different NDT methods to wood & allied biomaterials-visual inspection, optical inspection, dye penetration, radiographic, ultrasonic, acoustic, thermographic and other relevant NDT testing methods. Selection factors for specific test methods.

HL:30; HP:0; U:2; CR: 0; P: TWE 311

 

TWE 535

Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the course, students should be able to:

  1. Evaluate marketing strategies and the impact of the marketing environment on company structure.

  2. Perform market research to identify target markets, assess market share, and gather customer data.

  3. Optimize product design and packaging to enhance market appeal.

  4. Manage distribution systems and maintain lumber stock levels efficiently.

  5. Calculate distribution costs for wood products.

 

Marketing of Wood Products and Biomaterials

Marketing company, Marketing environment and its effect on company structure market research and advertising agencies. Product design and packaging. Market share. Product lifecycle. Marketing techniques for wood products. Lumber stock level. Warhousing and warehouse hygiene. Distribution system for wood products and distribution costs.

HL:30; HP:0; U:2; CR: 0; P:0

 

TWE 599

Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the course, students should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate problem-solving skills through an individual project in wood and biomaterials engineering.

  2. Apply research methods in wood products engineering while working on the final year project.

  3. Successfully complete the final year project under the guidance and supervision of a lecturer.

 

Final Year Project

Problem-solving, individual work, under the supervision of a lecturer.

HL:0; HP:180; U:6;CR: 0; P:0

 

 

6.2 LIST OF POSTGRADUATE COURSES BY OPTIONS

 

  1. COURSES TO BE OFFERED BY ALL MASTER’S DEGREE STUDENTS

Course Code

Course Title

Course Unit

Status

TWE 711

Ultra Structure and Properties of Selected Biomaterials   

3

C

TWE 712

Mechanical Behaviour of Wood & Biomaterials

3

C

TWE 713

Fluid Treatments of Wood & Fibrous Materials

3

R

TWE 798

Master’s Degree Seminar

2

C

TWE 799

Master’s Degree Project

6

C

 

  1. ADDITIONAL COURSES TO BE OFFERED BY STUDENTS IN VARIOUS OPTIONS

  2. Biomaterial Processing and Utilisation Option

Course Code

Course Title

Course Unit

Status

TWE 714

Wood Machinery and Systems Design

3

C

TWE 715

Advanced Structural Design with Wood & Biomaterials I

3

E

TWE 716

Pulp and Paper Technology I

3

E

TWE 717

Adhesives & Coatings for Sustainable Bioproducts 

3

E

TWE 718

Advanced Studies in Biocomposite Engineering I

3

C

TWE 719

Advanced Studies in Drying Wood & Fibrous Materials

3

R

TWE 721

Pollution Control in Forest Products Industries

2

E

TWE 720

Furniture Design and Manufacture with Sustainable Bioproducts

3

E

TWE 722

Advanced Studies in Biomass Waste Management 

2

E

TWE 726

Pulp and Paper Technology II

3

E

TWE 727

Advanced Topics in Wood & Biomaterials Engineering

1

E

TWE 730

Applied Research Methods in Wood & Biomaterials Engineering

2

E

TIE 711

Statistical Methods for Engineers

2

R

TIE 733

Project Planning & Control

3

E

TIE 750

Product Development

2

E

FPP 745

Life Cycle Analysis of Wood Products

2

E

 

SUMMARY

 

 

 

Total No of Units of Compulsory Courses

20

 

 

Total No of Units of Required Courses

08

 

 

Total No of Units of Elective Courses

29

 

 

 

 

  1. Structural Design with Wood & Biomaterials Option

Course Code

Course Title

Course Unit

Status

TWE 715

Advanced Structural Design with Wood & Biomaterials I

3

C

TWE 717

Adhesives & Coatings for Sustainable Bioproducts 

2

R

TWE 718

Advanced Studies in Biocomposite Engineering I

3

E

TWE 720

Furniture Design and Manufacture with Sustainable Bioproducts

3

E

TWE 725

Advanced Structural Design with Wood & Biomaterials II

3

C

TCE 709

Advanced Structural Analysis

3

E

TME 708

Finite Element Method for Structural Analysis

3

E

TIE 711

Statistical Methods for Engineers

2

R

TWE 719

Advanced Studies in Drying Wood & Fibrous Materials

3

E

TWE 722

Advanced Studies in Biomass Waste Management 

2

E

TWE 727

Advanced Topics in Wood & Biomaterials Engineering

1

E

TWE 728

Advanced Studies in Biocomposite Engineering II

3

E

TWE 730

Applied Research Methods in Wood & Biomaterials Engineering

2

E

TAE 712

Design of Agricultural Structures

3

E

TCE 715 

Advanced Properties of Construction Materials

3

E

TCE 727 

Matrix Formulation of Structural Systems

3

E

TIE 733

Project Planning & Control

3

E

TIE 750

Product Development

2

E

TME 707

Applied Numerical Methods

3

E

 

SUMMARY

 

 

 

Total No of Units of Compulsory Courses

20

 

 

Total No of Units of Required Courses

10

 

 

Total No of Units of Elective Courses

40

 

 

 

c. Furniture Design & Manufacturing

Course Code

Course Title

Course Unit

Status

TWE 715

Advanced Structural Design with Wood & Biomaterials I

3

C

TWE 717

Adhesives & Coatings for Sustainable Bioproducts 

2

C

TWE 720

Furniture Design and Manufacture with Sustainable Bioproducts

3

C

TWE 718

Advanced Studies in Biocomposite Engineering I

3

E

TWE 719

Advanced Studies in Drying Wood & Fibrous Materials

3

E

TWE 725

Advanced Structural Design with Wood & Biomaterials II

3

E

TWE 728

Advanced Studies in Biocomposite Engineering II

3

E

TIE 711

Statistical Methods for Engineers

2

R

TIE 751

Ergonomics

2

R

TCE 709

Advanced Structural Analysis

3

E

TME 708

Finite Element Method for Structural Analysis

3

E

TWE 727

Advanced Topics in Wood & Biomaterials Engineering

1

E

TWE 722

Advanced Studies in Biomass Waste Management 

2

E

TWE 730

Applied Research Methods in Wood & Biomaterials Engineering

2

E

TCE 727 

Matrix Formulation of Structural Systems

3

E

TIE 733

Project Planning & Control

3

E

TIE 742

Production-Inventory Systems Design

2

E

TIE 743

Computer-Aided Manufacturing

3

E

TIE 750

Product Development

2

E

TME 707

Applied Numerical Methods

3

E

 

SUMMARY

 

 

 

Total No of Units of Compulsory Courses

22

 

 

Total No of Units of Required Courses

07

 

 

Total No of Units of Elective Courses

39

 

 

 

d. Pulp and Paper Engineering Option

Course Code

Course Title

Course Unit

Status

TWE 716

Pulp and Paper Technology I

3

C

TWE 721

Pollution Control in Forest Products Industries

2

E

TWE 723

Wood Industry Management

2

E

TWE 726

Pulp and Paper Technology II

3

C

TIE 736

Industrial Safety Engineering

3

R

TIE 744

Advanced Industrial Quality Control

3

R

TIE 711

Statistical Methods for Engineers

2

R

TWE 717

Adhesives & Coatings for Sustainable Bioproducts 

2

E

TWE 718

Advanced Studies in Biocomposite Engineering I

3

E

TWE 719

Advanced Studies in Drying Wood & Fibrous Materials

3

E

TWE 722

Advanced Studies in Biomass Waste Management 

2

E

TWE 727

Advanced Topics in Wood & Biomaterials Engineering

1

E

TWE 728

Advanced Studies in Biocomposite Engineering II

3

E

TWE 730

Applied Research Methods in Wood & Biomaterials Engineering

2

E

TAE 725

Environmental Management & Impact Assessment

2

E

TIE 733

Project Planning & Control

3

E

TIE 750

Product Development

2

E

TME 720

Polymer Technology

4

E

 

SUMMARY

 

 

 

Total No of Units of Compulsory Courses

20

 

 

Total No of Units of Required Courses

08

 

 

Total No of Units of Elective Courses

31

 

 

 

e. Biocomposite Engineering Option

Course Code

Course Title

Course Unit

Status

TWE 714

Wood Machinery and Systems Design

3

E

TWE 715

Advanced Structural Design with Wood & Biomaterials I

3

E

TWE 716

Pulp and Paper Technology I

3

R

TWE 717

Adhesives & Coatings for Sustainable Bioproducts 

2

R

TWE 718

Advanced Studies in Biocomposite Engineering I

3

C

TWE 719

Advanced Studies in Drying Wood & Fibrous Materials

3

E

TWE 728

Advanced Studies in Biocomposite Engineering II

3

C

TIE 711

Statistical Methods for Engineers

2

R

TWE 720

Furniture Design and Manufacture with Sustainable Bioproducts

3

E

TWE 721

Pollution Control in Forest Products Industries

2

E

TWE 722

Advanced Studies in Biomass Waste Management 

2

E

TWE 727

Advanced Topics in Wood & Biomaterials Engineering

1

E

TWE 730

Applied Research Methods in Wood & Biomaterials Engineering

2

E

TIE 733

Project Planning & Control

3

E

TIE 750

Product Development

2

E

TIE 736

Industrial Safety Engineering

3

E

TIE 744

Advanced Industrial Quality Control

3

E

FPP 745

Life Cycle Analysis of Wood Products

2

E

 

SUMMARY

 

 

 

Total No of Units of Compulsory Courses

20

 

 

Total No of Units of Required Courses

10

 

 

Total No of Units of Elective Courses

33

 

 

f. Bioenergy & Environmental Engineering Option

Course Code

Course Title

Course Unit

Status

TWE 722

Advanced Studies in Biomass Waste Management 

2

E

TWE 701

Advanced Studies in Bioenergy Engineering I

3

C

TWE 702

Advanced Studies in Bioenergy Engineering II

3

C

TAE 702

Renewable Energy Technology

3

E

TIE 711

Statistical Methods for Engineers

2

R

TIE 726

Energy Systems Modelling

3

E